coolvintagecameras - Gelto D-III 127 mm Vintage Film Camera Professionally Tested in Great Condition - CoolVintageCameras - Camera
coolvintagecameras - Gelto D-III 127 mm Vintage Film Camera Professionally Tested in Great Condition - CoolVintageCameras - Camera
coolvintagecameras - Gelto D-III 127 mm Vintage Film Camera Professionally Tested in Great Condition - CoolVintageCameras - Camera
coolvintagecameras - Gelto D-III 127 mm Vintage Film Camera Professionally Tested in Great Condition - CoolVintageCameras - Camera
coolvintagecameras - Gelto D-III 127 mm Vintage Film Camera Professionally Tested in Great Condition - CoolVintageCameras - Camera
coolvintagecameras - Gelto D-III 127 mm Vintage Film Camera Professionally Tested in Great Condition - CoolVintageCameras - Camera

Gelto D-III 127 mm Vintage Film Camera Professionally Tested in Great Condition

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Shutter works great, camera is in great condition for being incredibly old. The Gelto (ゲルト)[1] is a series of Japanese cameras taking 3×4cm exposures on 127 film, made between 1936–7 and 1943 and produced again after the war until about 1952.[2] The maker was Tōa Kōki, perhaps called Takahashi Kōgaku at the beginning,[3] and some advertisements also give the name "Gelto Camera Werke" (which was probably not the same of any actual company, see Camera Works). The Gelto is very similar to the earlier Picny, except that it has a die-cast body with angled edges.

Both cameras are inspired from the Gewirette by Wirgin. Some characteristics are common to all the models. The lens and shutter assembly is collapsible and mounted on a focusing helical. There is a tubular optical finder offset to the left and an advance knob at the right end.

On the prewar and wartime models, the top plate is removable for film loading, analogously to the bottom loading of the Leica screw models. It is locked in place by a key. There are normally two red windows in the back to control film advance. Under the camera, the serial number is engraved on a round plate to the left and the tripod screw is offset to the right.